The bonding of blood

imagesCAVEN7GF  Drinking the blood of a Vampire has an entrancing effect.  For a human it creates a strong bond on the Vampire’s part, the effect is different for both parties.  For the human it will result in an overwhelming affection towards the vampire, but the results are not permanent.  For the bond to remain intact, the human must consume the vampire’s blood regularly, but best no drink from another as the initiating vampire will know and the act will infuriate him.  For a Vampire to share his blood with a human is considered a gift and for the human to drink from another is an insult to the Vampire.  The bond to the human for the Vampire is quite different.  The Vampire that has allowed a human to drink from him sees the human as “his”.  The bond will allow for him to know what the human is thinking at all times, allowing for him to protect them if endangered.  All Vampire blood is potent but the more elder the Vampire, the more potent his blood.

A Vampire that shares his blood with another Vampire is a rare find indeed.  The result of this bonding is different than when introduced to a human.  When a Vampire allows for his blood to be shared the receiver will inherit some of their knowledge and experiences.  The more often this occurs, the more knowledge and experiences are shared, thus as vampires see each others as competitors it is a rare act indeed for one to feed upon the other.  Upon this occasion it would signify a great trust between two immortals.

Different from the rest is the initial feeding during the process of being turned.  The new Vampire will inherit a strong bond with his maker, he will receive new abilities common to all turnings as well as an “affectionate” bond with his maker.  The maker will have the ability to summon and command the new vampire but as his maker he typically has only the best intentions for his “offspring” when having done so.  In the beginning the bond is stronger as the new vampire will require much guidance, but as the vampire ages the bond will weaken but will never go away.

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