The Legend of the Bruxsa

The Bruxsa originates from Portuguese Vampire legends.  Though it has many of the similarities of the European Vampire there are several unique characteristics of the species.

The Bruxsa, mostly females, were said to have been witches in their mortal lives making them difficult to detect and nearly impossible to kill.  Bruxsa are said to have the ability to tolerate sunlight but are at their most powerful state between midnight and 2:00 a.m.  Legend states that their powers are a gift from Satan himself.  The Bruxsa gather at crossroads once a week (said to be either Tuesday or Friday) to worship their dark master, becoming stronger after every meeting.  When at their peak, the Bruxsa is said to have the ability to shift into the form of an animal further enabling them to avoid detection prior to attacking.  Some legends state that the Bruxsa takes the form of a large bird when she leaves her lair at night to feed but shifts back into  the form of a beautiful woman when she stalks her prey.

There is little that can be done to fend off the Bruxsa.  Some say that a particular amulet made of steel or iron will deter her briefly but once the Bruxsa has acquired the scent of her prey, there is little that can be done to protect the intended victim.  Historical documents mention that there was an incantation that could be spoken to the beast but throughout time, the spell has been lost.

The Bruxsa though attracted to hunting the male human, has a taste for children as well.  Women would protect their children from her in several different ways.  Some would sew garlic into the lining of the children’s garments, some would place a pair of scissors beneath the child’s pillow and others would drive iron spikes into the floor around the child’s bed to protect him while he slept.  If it was suspected that a Bruxsa was stalking a child, the mother would boil the child’s clothing while stabbing it with with a knife.  The Bruxsa was said to feel the pain of the blows.  The same tactic was used as revenge for the mother that had lost her child to a Bruxsa.  the mother would boil the clothing day after day and stab it in grief until the Bruxsa would come and beg for mercy, mercy that she likely would never receive.

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