Deep pocket discounts for “Adrian’s Fury” and “To Be His Soulmate”

Fall 2014 Halloween Discounts through my Publisher.

Visit DonnaInk Publications, L.L.C. at http://www.donnaink.com or http://www.donnaink.org today!

If you’ve been waiting for the right time to pick up your copies of “To be His Soulmate” and the newly released “Adrian’s Fury” (Volumes I & II of “The Adrian Trilogy”).

Now is the time!

My Publisher, DonnaInk Publications, L.L.C., has a bloody good sale price on both volumes from now through Halloween!  Use the coupon code: Horror Rama14 and receive an additional 20% off of the publisher’s total stock (all genres)!!!! The publishing house already extends the ultimate savings through deep discounts from retail of $5 to $7 less per copy – plus the20% coupon and you cannot go wrong . . . visit today and get your Vampire Frenzy fulfilled for less!!!!

Visit DonnaInk Publications, L.L.C. website and search the horror shelf now!  Get your gore on for Halloween 2014!!

http://www.donnaink.com or http://www.donnaink.org

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DonnaInk Publications, L.L.C. (www.donnaink.org)

 

Vlad Tepes

Vlad Tepes.

 

The Vrykolakas – A Greek Vampire Legend

Visit my publisher for deep pocket discounts and an additional 20% off.      The Greeks believed that a human could become a Vrykolakas after death by having lived an ungodly life, being buried on unconsecrated ground, being excommunicated or by having eaten the meat of a lamb that had been injured or killed by a wolf.  Some Greek legends insinuate that even a werewolf could become one of the Vrykolkas upon it’s death.  Individuals that had red hair and grey eyes were suspected of having been one of the undead, which I find intriguing as other ancient vampire lore states that any vampire with red hair was a direct descendant of Judas Escariot’s cursed blood line.

Unlike other undead beings from surrounding continents, the Greek Vampire was not an attractive creature.  Legends state that the Vrykolakas appears to be completely drained of it’s blood,  but once the vampire had fed, he would swell into a blood gorged creature before returning to it’s grave.   Greek legends state that this was the only time that the destructive creature could meet it’s demise.  The Vampire was said to return to it’s grave every Saturday, but would rise again the following day to wreak havoc upon nearby residents.  The Vrykolakas was said to have a wide range of activity, ranging from merely wandering from it’s grave to performing poltergeist-like activities.  Some legends state that the Vampire would knock at a perspective victims door, if the person would open the door on the first knock they were certain to arise the next day as one of the undead.  The legend lingers to this day, a traditional Greek household will only open the door upon the second knock.

The Vrykolakas has been in ancient Greek history for centuries and is still prevalent to this day.  A tale said to have occurred sometime in the 1950′s can be found in the in The book of vampires, it goes something like this:

A husband and wife that loved each other dearly began to have problems as the husband had lost his job and become severely depressed.  The man began to go out all night and would not return home until the following morning.  This of course caused the wife to become deeply concerned and afraid as she would be left alone night after night.  By the time the wife realized that her husband had been drinking heavily he had already become an alcoholic.  One evening the wife had him followed on his nightly outing, the follower came to a tree on the edge of town where the man was known to sit and drink.  There hanging from the tree was the body of her husband.  The wife was devastated and soon began to act irrationally.  She would stay indoors at all times and refuse to open the door for visitors.  On her seldom trips away from her home, people noticed that she had become pale and sickly.  Eventually she would confess to the town’s religious official that she had been being haunted by her dead husband.  It seemed that on the first night after his body was found hanging from the tree, he had returned to his home and knocked at the door.  He begged his wife to let him in as he said something about needing his shoes.  The wife was terrified but allowed her husband into the home.  The visits continued on a nightly basis from there on out, the wife had even admitted to having lain with her husband every night for several consecutive months.  The religious official became concerned for the safety of the town and decided that they would destroy the Vrykolakas.  Having committed suicide and then being buried on unconsecrated ground had surely turned the man, the officials would plot his demise according to ancient legend.  The townspeople eventually found the man’s dead body, shriveled and disheveled he lay as they prepared to drive a wooden stake through his heart.  Eyewitness accounts state that the man moaned as the stake was inserted, other accounts said that his body turned to dust upon completion of his writhing.  Now having freed themselves from the Vrykolakas, the town would have another problem to deal with, his now pregnant wife.  Unfortunately the tale ends here, one could only imagine from this point what came to be of the widow and her unborn spawn.

Stay tuned for more vampire legends as well as tidbits from “The Adrian Trilogy!”

After death by having lived an ungodly life, being buried on unconsecrated ground, being excommunicated or by having eaten the meat of a lamb that had been injured or killed by a wolf. Some Greek legends insinuate that even a werewolf could become one of the Vrykolkas upon it’s death. Individuals that had red hair and grey eyes were suspected of having been one of the undead, which I find intriguing as other ancient vampire lore states that any vampire with red hair was a direct descendant of Judas Escariot’s cursed blood line.

Unlike other undead beings from surrounding continents, the Greek Vampire was not an attractive creature. Legends state that the Vrykolakas appears to be completely drained of it’s blood, but once the vampire had fed, he would swell into a blood gorged creature before returning to it’s grave. Greek legends state that this was the only time that the destructive creature could meet it’s demise. The Vampire was said to return to it’s grave every Saturday, but would rise again the following day to wreak havoc upon nearby residents. The Vrykolakas was said to have a wide range of activity, ranging from merely wandering from it’s grave to performing poltergeist-like activities. Some legends state that the Vampire would knock at a perspective victims door, if the person would open the door on the first knock they were certain to arise the next day as one of the undead. The legend lingers to this day, a traditional Greek household will only open the door upon the second knock.

The Vrykolakas has been in ancient Greek history for centuries and is still prevalent to this day. A tale said to have occurred sometime in the 1950′s can be found in the in The book of vampires, it goes something like this:

A husband and wife that loved each other dearly began to have problems as the husband had lost his job and become severely depressed. The man began to go out all night and would not return home until the following morning. This of course caused the wife to become deeply concerned and afraid as she would be left alone night after night. By the time the wife realized that her husband had been drinking heavily he had already become an alcoholic. One evening the wife had him followed on his nightly outing, the follower came to a tree on the edge of town where the man was known to sit and drink. There hanging from the tree was the body of her husband. The wife was devastated and soon began to act irrationally. She would stay indoors at all times and refuse to open the door for visitors. On her seldom trips away from her home, people noticed that she had become pale and sickly. Eventually she would confess to the town’s religious official that she had been being haunted by her dead husband. It seemed that on the first night after his body was found hanging from the tree, he had returned to his home and knocked at the door. He begged his wife to let him in as he said something about needing his shoes. The wife was terrified but allowed her husband into the home. The visits continued on a nightly basis from there on out, the wife had even admitted to having lain with her husband every night for several consecutive months. The religious official became concerned for the safety of the town and decided that they would destroy the Vrykolakas. Having committed suicide and then being buried on unconsecrated ground had surely turned the man, the officials would plot his demise according to ancient legend. The townspeople eventually found the man’s dead body, shriveled and disheveled he lay as they prepared to drive a wooden stake through his heart. Eyewitness accounts state that the man moaned as the stake was inserted, other accounts said that his body turned to dust upon completion of his writhing. Now having freed themselves from the Vrykolakas, the town would have another problem to deal with, his now pregnant wife. Unfortunately the tale ends here, one could only imagine from this point what came to be of the widow and her unborn spawn.

Stay tuned for more vampire legends as well as tidbits from, “The Adrian Trilogy!”

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Visit the publisher for major discounts from retailers.

Visit the publisher for major discounts from retailers.

The Legend of the Bruxsa Vampire

Visit my publisher, DonnaInk Publications, L.L.C. for deep pocket discounts from retail sales.

Currently, all titles are 20% off the already reduced publisher rates!

The Bruxsa originates from Portuguese Vampire legends. Though it has many of the similarities of the European Vampire there are several unique characteristics of the species.

The Bruxsa, mostly females, were said to have been witches in their mortal lives making them difficult to detect and nearly impossible to kill. Bruxsa are said to have the ability to tolerate sunlight but are at their most powerful state between midnight and 2:00 a.m. Legend states that their powers are a gift from Satan himself. The Bruxsa gather at crossroads once a week (said to be either Tuesday or Friday) to worship their dark master, becoming stronger after every meeting. When at their peak, the Bruxsa is said to have the ability to shift into the form of an animal further enabling them to avoid detection prior to attacking. Some legends state that the Bruxsa takes the form of a large bird when she leaves her lair at night to feed but shifts back into the form of a beautiful woman when she stalks her prey.

There is little that can be done to fend off the Bruxsa. Some say that a particular amulet made of steel or iron will deter her briefly but once the Bruxsa has acquired the scent of her prey, there is little that can be done to protect the intended victim. Historical documents mention that there was an incantation that could be spoken to the beast but throughout time, the spell has been lost.

The Bruxsa though attracted to hunting the male human, has a taste for children as well. Women would protect their children from her in several different ways. Some would sew garlic into the lining of the children’s garments, some would place a pair of scissors beneath the child’s pillow and others would drive iron spikes into the floor around the child’s bed to protect him while he slept. If it was suspected that a Bruxsa was stalking a child, the mother would boil the child’s clothing while stabbing it with with a knife. The Bruxsa was said to feel the pain of the blows. The same tactic was used as revenge for the mother that had lost her child to a Bruxsa. the mother would boil the clothing day after day and stab it in grief until the Bruxsa would come and beg for mercy, mercy that she likely would never receive.

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Visit the publisher for major discounts from retailers.

Visit the publisher for major discounts from retailers.

The New Orleans Advocate interviews Lyn Gibson, a DonnaInk Publications, L.L.C. author

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Gibson said her ability to connect with the supernatural world caused tension within her religious family, and after working with the police on unsolved cases for a few years, Gibson, who is originally from Pearl River, Miss., took up writing . . .

The New Orleans Advocate interviewed Author Lyn Gibson (http://theadvocate.com/news/livingston/7945077-123/author-sinks-fangs-into-vampire) who lives in Independence Louisiana has been busy promoting her book. She is also a national radio personality and a historian of vampire legend and lore. Following the launch of her new book, Gibson has written on several blogs, interviewed on several talk radio programs and attended the annual “Spooky Empire” horror convention in Orlando, Florida courtesy of her publishing house. She was recently a guest at Mariner’s Inn in Hammond for her official book launch party.

The series, Gibson said, is based in the north shore area of Lake Pontchartrain, and many well-known landmarks are mentioned throughout the books.

Gibson gives some of the credit for the book’s success to her publisher, D.L. Quesinberry, CEO, president and founder of DonnaInk Publications, who she said has been wonderful to work with.

“Ms. Quesinberry believes in me and my series,” Gibson said. “It’s not easy, as a basically unknown writer, to be able to get a publishing contract, but Ms. Quesinberry saw promise in my title and has taken me under her wing.”

To learn more about the trilogy, visit http://www.donnaink.org and check out the horror shelf! Also, visit Lyn Gibson on Facebook, Twitter and WordPress: https://authorlyngibson.wordpress.com.

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Check out the many reviews:

Kim says: “I was unable to put it down. Was very addicting. It was a new take on southern vampires. Can’t wait for the next one.”

Tkenyon said:  “This book is so beautifully written that it draws you into their time and space. I couldn’t put it down. It has intrigue, passion, drama and a unique perspective on the paranormal world of the vampire in our everyday lives . It is definately an adults only book . I can’t wait for the sequel! Don’t miss out on this one!”

Deseret Hatcher raves:   “Lyn Gibson gives it to us with no holds barred in this sensual and did I say sensual erotic vampire tale. The Adrian Trilogy is destined for success. The characters are modern and believable – they use cell phones and iPads, they travel by jet and they have a true lust for flesh.”

Wanda H. had this to say:  “It was nice to get away from the real world and get away to something intriguing and sexy. I would think about it even after I had put it down. The TV and movie series are all watered down and made for teens. I liked To Be His Soulmate better than some of Anne Rice’s books.”

Susie Cambe was quoted as saying: “Lyn Gibson is a mesmerizing writer. As a writer, she successfully takes you where she wants you to journey deep within a dark world, living in the shadows of the moss-strewn Deep South. Her characters develop a strong relationship with the reader and continue from book to book in her trilogy. Gibson’s books are captivating to readers passionate about the horror genre, as well as college students and anyone brave enough to turn the pages of her books.”

Contact
Ms. Desere’t Shearer
888-564-7741, extension #2
deseret.shearer@donnaink.org