The Adrian Trilogy, 4th of July Discount, 25% Off

The Adrian Trilogy 4th of July Discount

Adrian’s Legacy ranking at 560 on AMAZON!

#560 on AMAZON

TOP 1000 on AMAZON

Just a little update for The Adrian Trilogy fans . . . Adrian’s Legacy is closing in ranks!

#560 in Supernatural > Vampires
#1972 in Horror > Vampires

Way to go Lyn Gibson!

dpInk Horror Affirmation Dailies

dpInk Horror Affirmation Dailies

Visit http://www.donnaink.com for your set of The Adrian Trilogy for the reduced rate of: $24.75 for a “limited time only!”

 

Vampires…..

christian1        The word “Vampire” was not found in the English language until 1734, in a   book  titled “Travels of Three English Gentlemen”.  One of the most quoted paragraphs of the book is as follows:

‘The Vampyres, which come out of the graves in the night-time, rush upon people sleeping in their beds, suck out all their blood, and destroy them. They attack men, women, and children; sparing neither age nor sex. The people, attacked by them, complain of suffocation, and a great interception of spirits; after which, they soon expire. Some of them, being asked, at the point of death, what is the matter with them? say they suffer in the manner just related from people lately dead, or rather the spectres of those people; upon which, their bodies (from the description given of them, by the sick person,) being dug out of the graves, appear in all parts, as the nostrils, cheeks, breast, mouth, &c. turgid and full of blood. Their countenances are fresh and ruddy; and their nails, as well as hair, very much grown. And, though they have been much longer dead than many other bodies, which are perfectly putrified, notthe least mark of corruption is visible upon them. Those who are destroyed by them, after their death, become Vampyres; so that, to prevent so spreading an evil, it is found requisite to drive a stake through the dead body, from whence, on this occasion, the blood flows as if the person was alive. Sometimes the body is dug out of the grave, and burnt to ashes; upon which, all disturbances cease. The Hungarians call these spectre Pamgri, and the Servians, Vampyres; but the etymon or reason of these names is not known.’

In other cultures  the word can be traced back to 1047 A.D.  It can be found in a manuscript of the book of Psalms where a priest writes of a man whose name meant “Wicked Vampire”.  Predating the name “Vampire” Ancient Greeks, Pomans and Mesopotamians recorded blood sucking demons in texts before Christ walked the Earth.   These precursors of the modern day Vampire are depicted as creatures and spirits.  The modern day Vampire originates almost exclusively from the 18th century South-Eastern Europe, when verbal traditions of many ethnic groups of the region were recorded and published.  The common belief was that the Vampire was a reanimated corpse that sucked the blood from their victims either from their neck or stomach. Voltaire wrote:

“These vampires were corpses, who went out of their graves at night to suck the blood of the living, either at their throats or stomachs, after which they returned to their cemeteries. The persons so sucked waned, grew pale, and fell into consumption; while the sucking corpses grew fat, got rosy, and enjoyed an excellent appetite. It was in Poland, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Austria, and Lorraine, that the dead made this good cheer.”

By the 19th century the Vampire had evolved into a more “mortal” appearance, only revealing the beast within when provoked.  Though not as attractive as the modern day vampire, They retained their youth through feeding on their victims.  The 19th century vampire fed indiscriminately having no concern of seducing their prey.

Today’s vampire has evolved to a sophisticated and beautiful creature, violent only when provoked.  The modern era Vampire has found a more open minded society where he is accepted and respected for what he is and represents.

 

Follow me at www.facebook.com/authorlyngibson

The Medieval Vampire

perperikon-vampire-bulgaria-skeleton-.si    The “18th century Vampire Conspiracy” is said to have ignited the basis of the modern era Vampire.  Though we know from previous blogs, there are other examples of documentation that exist from before the Bible was ever penned.  Nevertheless, there was a frenzy of Vampire sightings during this era in and near Transylvania, resulting in frequent stakings and grave diggings.  The panic began as an outbreak of vampire attacks occurred in East Prussia in 1721 which  spread to outlying regions up until 1734.

 

Two famous vampire cases, which were the first to be officially recorded, involved the corpses of Peter Plogojowitz and Arnold Paole from Serbia. Plogojowitz was reported to have died at the age of 62, but allegedly returned after his death asking his son for food. When the son refused, he was found dead the following day. Plogojowitz soon supposedly returned and attacked some neighbours who died from loss of blood.   In the second case, Arnold Paole, an ex-soldier turned farmer who allegedly was attacked by a vampire years before, died while haying. After his death, people began to die in the surrounding area and it was widely believed that Paole had returned to prey on the neighbors.

So who was there to document these occurrences?  For one, Dom Augustine Calmet, a well respected French theologian and scholar.  Calmet was also a monk, in 1688 he joined the same Order at the Abbey of Saint-Mansuy at Toul, where he was admitted to profession on the 23 October of the following year.   After his ordination, 17 March 1696, he was appointed to teach philosophy and theology at the Abbey of Moyenmoutier.

In 1746 Calmet comprised a comprehensive treatise concerning the existence of Vampires.  As you can imagine, the compilation of reports on vampire incidents was quite controversial for his time, therefore it was certainly read by all to include even Voltaire.  In his Philosophical dictionary, Voltaire wrote:

These vampires were corpses, who went out of their graves at night to suck the blood of the living, either at their throats or stomachs, after which they returned to their cemeteries. The persons so sucked waned, grew pale, and fell into consumption; while the sucking corpses grew fat, got rosy, and enjoyed an excellent appetite. It was in Poland, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Austria, and Lorraine, that the dead made this good cheer.

An example of Calmets’ reports:


“It is now about fifteen years since a soldier, who was quartered in the house of a Haidamack peasant, upon the frontiers of Hungary, saw, as he was at the table with his landlord, a stranger come in and sit down by them. The master of the house and the rest of the company were strangely terrified, but the soldier knew not what to make of it. The next day the peasant died, and, upon the soldier’s enquiring into the meaning of it, he was told that it was his landlord’s father who had been dead and buried above ten years that came and sat down at table, and gave his son notice of his death.

“The soldier soon propagated the story through his regiment, and by this means it reached the general officers, who commissioned the count de Cabreras … to make an exact enquiry into the fact. The count, attended by several officers, a surgeon, and a notary, came to the house, and took the deposition of all the family, who unanimously swore that the spectre was the landlord’s father, and that all the soldier had said was strictly true. The same was also attested by all the inhabitants of the village.

“In consequence of this the body of the spectre was dug up, and found to be in the same state as if it has been but just dead…. The count de Cabreras ordered its head to be cut off, and the corpse to be buried again. He then proceeded to take depositions against other spectres of the same sort, and particularly against a man who had been dead above thirty years, and had made his appearance there several times in his own house at meal-time. At his first visit he had fastened upon the neck of his own brother, and sucked his blood; at his second, he had treated one of his children in the same manner; and the third time, he fastened upon a servant of the family, and all three died upon the spot.

“Upon this evidence, the count gave orders that he should be dug up, and being found, like the first, with his blood in a fluid state, as if he had been alive, a great nail was drove through his temples, and he was buried again. The count ordered a third to be burnt, who had been dead above sixteen years, and was found guilty of murdering two of his own children by sucking their blood.

“The gentleman who acquainted me with all these particulars, had them from the count de Cabreras himself, at Fribourg in Brisgau, in the year 1730.”

Sound pretty convincing to me, You?

Read More: http://vampires.monstrous.com/The_18th-Century_Vampire_Controversy/All_Pages.htm#ixzz2XAktodoM

                         http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vampire_folklore_by_region

The New Orleans Vampire

New Orleans and surrounding areas have been home to the undead for centuries.  Perhaps the oldest and most famous, Jacques de Saint Germain, was one of the first.  Jacques, or who we all know today as Vampire Jack is often sighted near his old home on the corner of Ursuline and Royal in the French Quarter where he lived around 1909.  Jack is said to have walked the earth before Christ and has a left lengthy record of his existence since.  Having held company with many of the elite throughout history such as: Casanova, Madame de Pampadour, Voltaire, King Louis XV, Catherine the Great, Anton Mesmer and many more.  Voltaire, the 18th Century philosopher, described Saint-Germain as “a man who never dies, and who knows everything.”  His most recent publicized appearance was in 1983.  Using the name Richard Chanfray, Jacques confessed his true nature and then subsequently faked his own suicide, disappearing from the publics’ eye once more.  Though Count de Saint Germain is still known to roam the streets of the French Quarter, he is maintaining a much lower profile these days, unless you know where to look.